Top Tips for Choosing the Right Yarn for Your Project

The best knitters know that the type of yarn chosen can make or break a project. Here are some of the most important considerations that you need to keep in mind when choosing the type of yarn for your project.

Check the Gauge

The labels for yarn indicate its gauge or tension. This figure represents the number of stitches typically made per inch. Your pattern will indicate what gauge you need to successfully complete the project. Keep in mind that the gauge does not denote the size of the project and that just because two different yarns have the same gauge does not imply that they will work the same for your pattern. There are other factors to think about such as the texture, drape, and type of yarn fiber.

yarn basics

Identify the Drape

When choosing a pattern for your project, make sure that you also determine how you want the finished item to hang. That is, do you want a piece that is more flow or something that is more structured? If you prefer a very dense drape, make sure that you go with a very thin yarn. If you would rather have a more relaxed drape, find a thicker yarn and use bigger needles that will enable you to create bigger stitches.

Follow the Recommendation of Your Pattern

threadAs much as possible, choose the yarn that your pattern recommends. Most patterns generally come with a recommendation for a specific type of yarn. If you are just a beginner or intermediate crafter, following this recommendation is very crucial. Remember that using the wrong type of yarn can result in a product that is completely different from what you originally intended to make.

If you cannot find or do not want to use the yarn specified on your pattern, the safest method is to talk to the sales associate at the yarn shop. Make sure that your replacement has the same elasticity and weight. Pay attention to the actual yardage indicated on the label and not just the number of grams or ounces. Another thing to keep in mind is that different fiber types will yield different outcomes, even when they have the same gauge.